thecalamityjess

tombstone-hero:

Please Share This

Thousands of Tumblr users have been misled by a post suggesting that an unidentified elementary school girl was battered and sexually assaulted by her classmates only to have authorities excuse it as “rough housing”. This story is awful and provokes anger amongst its readers, as it should. However it’s a LIE

This article smelled “off” when I read it because it clearly stated that the mother withheld her daughter’s name to save her from humiliation. Which made the photo of the girl seem off. Why hide her name if you’ll show her face? That’s because this isn’t an article on CNN like the post suggests and that little girl isn’t a sexual assault victim. You’re looking at a photo of Makayla McEvoy. She was 7 when this photo was taken in 2012 after she survived a Kangaroo attack.

Little miss McEvoy is an Australian animal attack survivor. She is NOT an American rape victim from Georgia (thank God)

The artificial news story was fabricated by a Tumblr user called dropmycumberbritches (who now goes by vegetableighs since handing the account off to someone else to avoid heat) After posting the artificial story to raise awareness to Rape Culture, the Tumblr user then celebrated and sang their own praise. Luckily another Tumble user, untrue-posts, found the article, did some digging and reblogged the initial post with the real info.

However, the original post is still picking up speed and is sitting comfortably at 20k+ posts. Please, spread this news and let everyone know that there is not a Georgian rape victim going uncared for. Instead, there’s a poor Australian girl who was attacked by a Kangaroo in 2012 who recovered, only to have her face used for some else’s agenda.

angelclark

angelclark:

99-Year-Old Lady Sews A Dress A Day For Children In Need 

Lillian Weber, a 99-year-old good Samaritan from Iowa, has spent the last few years sewing a dress a day for the Little Dresses For Africa charity, a Christian organization that distributes dresses to children in need in Africa and elsewhere.

Weber’s goal is to make 1,000 dresses by the time she turns 100 on May 6th. So far, she’s made more than 840. Though she says she could make two a day, she only makes one – but each single dress she makes per day is personalized with careful stitchwork. She hopes that each little girl who receives her dress can take pride in her new garment.

fuckyeahrenaissancefaire

confessionsofacostumer:

Here is the difference between fashion design and costume design: fashion designers design clothing, costume designers design characters. 

One of my favorite places to see characters (and costumes!) is the Renaissance Pleasure Faire in Irwindale, California. I never really thought of myself as the Ren Faire type but I was dragged along by a costumer friend a few years ago and have made a point of attending ever since. The people watching, the campy shows, the greasy food, the merriment. It’s so much fun to do for exactly one day a year. 

I didn’t dress up. I don’t dress up. Maybe working in costumes has taken some of the excitement out of it for me or maybe I’m just curmudgeonly, but I don’t even like participating in Halloween so medieval role playing sounds even less appealing. I did however wear a baseball cap which is very out of character for me so who knows, maybe the next step is a hoop skirt and corset and running away to be a professional wench. Maybe that’s how they get you, a seemingly innocent hat choice that leads to a life as a Ren Faire carnie. 

I never cease to be impressed with the amount of effort people put into their characters. The details of their costumes, their accents, their lingo. I am even more amazed that despite the desert heat almost everyone there is in heavy, layered, often leathered costumes, and still in good spirits. Even in high-waisted shorts and a lightweight denim shirt I was whining and wilting, a reminder of how grateful I am to be born in an era of air conditioning.

Modern privilege aside, I love costumes and the role they play in telling the story of who we are (or, who we wish we were). Over the years I’ve watched the power that a costume has to transform an actor from himself (or herself) into another person entirely. Costumes are a way in which we explore the complexities and nuances of time, of history, of humanity. 

Going to the Ren Faire always reminds me why I fell in love with costumes. 

I’m one of those re-enactors at the Irwindale Faire. The first year I went, I wore a loose skirt and a sleeveless shirt. Nine years later, I wear 9.5 yards of linen underneath 12 yards of wool. The heat in Irwindale is a problem; our group has medics who are logically there to help with accidental combat, forge, or kitchen injuries, but in actuality spend most of their time caring for people who overheat. It’s sticky and dirty and makes you think cold showers are gifts from heaven, but it’s the most enjoyable time of the year for me and I’d never, ever trade it in. 

Today when I got home from work, I watched an episode of Buffy and an episode of Angel while doing some hand sewing on my Faire skirt. Then I turned over the laundry in the washing machine and made some progress on the pile of unfolded clothes upstairs. 

It might not be world changing, but it’s progress. 

My life might not be exactly where I want or thought it should be at this point, but it’s still a pretty good life.